Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Geosci. Model Dev., 8, 431-452, 2015
http://www.geosci-model-dev.net/8/431/2015/
doi:10.5194/gmd-8-431-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Development and technical paper
24 Feb 2015
A test of an optimal stomatal conductance scheme within the CABLE land surface model
M. G. De Kauwe1, J. Kala2, Y.-S. Lin1, A. J. Pitman2, B. E. Medlyn1, R. A. Duursma3, G. Abramowitz2, Y.-P. Wang4, and D. G. Miralles5,6 1Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
2Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Climate Systems Science and Climate Change Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia
3Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
4CSIRO Ocean and Atmosphere Flagship, Private Bag #1, Aspendale, Victoria 3195, Australia
5Department of Earth Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam 1081 HV, the Netherlands
6Laboratory of Hydrology and Water Management, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Abstract. Stomatal conductance (gs) affects the fluxes of carbon, energy and water between the vegetated land surface and the atmosphere. We test an implementation of an optimal stomatal conductance model within the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) land surface model (LSM). In common with many LSMs, CABLE does not differentiate between gs model parameters in relation to plant functional type (PFT), but instead only in relation to photosynthetic pathway. We constrained the key model parameter "g1", which represents plant water use strategy, by PFT, based on a global synthesis of stomatal behaviour. As proof of concept, we also demonstrate that the g1 parameter can be estimated using two long-term average (1960–1990) bioclimatic variables: (i) temperature and (ii) an indirect estimate of annual plant water availability. The new stomatal model, in conjunction with PFT parameterisations, resulted in a large reduction in annual fluxes of transpiration (~ 30% compared to the standard CABLE simulations) across evergreen needleleaf, tundra and C4 grass regions. Differences in other regions of the globe were typically small. Model performance against upscaled data products was not degraded, but did not noticeably reduce existing model–data biases. We identified assumptions relating to the coupling of the vegetation to the atmosphere and the parameterisation of the minimum stomatal conductance as areas requiring further investigation in both CABLE and potentially other LSMs. We conclude that optimisation theory can yield a simple and tractable approach to predicting stomatal conductance in LSMs.

Citation: De Kauwe, M. G., Kala, J., Lin, Y.-S., Pitman, A. J., Medlyn, B. E., Duursma, R. A., Abramowitz, G., Wang, Y.-P., and Miralles, D. G.: A test of an optimal stomatal conductance scheme within the CABLE land surface model, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, 431-452, doi:10.5194/gmd-8-431-2015, 2015.
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Stomatal conductance affects the fluxes of carbon, energy and water between the vegetated land surface and the atmosphere. We test an implementation of an optimal stomatal conductance model within the CABLE land surface model (LSM). The new implementation resulted in a large reduction in the annual fluxes of transpiration across evergreen needleleaf, tundra and C4 grass regions. We conclude that optimisation theory can yield a tractable approach to predicting stomatal conductance in LSMs.
Stomatal conductance affects the fluxes of carbon, energy and water between the vegetated land...
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