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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 10, issue 5
Geosci. Model Dev., 10, 1849–1872, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-10-1849-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Geosci. Model Dev., 10, 1849–1872, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-10-1849-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Model evaluation paper 05 May 2017

Model evaluation paper | 05 May 2017

weather@home 2: validation of an improved global–regional climate modelling system

Benoit P. Guillod et al.
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Short summary
The weather@home climate modelling system uses the computing power of volunteers around the world to generate a very large number of climate model simulations. This is particularly useful when investigating extreme weather events, notably for the attribution of these events to anthropogenic climate change. A new version of weather@home is presented and evaluated, which includes an improved representation of the land surface and increased horizontal resolution over Europe.
The weather@home climate modelling system uses the computing power of volunteers around the...
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