Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 1133-1160, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1133-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Model experiment description paper
29 Mar 2018
The Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (CDRMIP): rationale and experimental protocol for CMIP6
David P. Keller1, Andrew Lenton2,3, Vivian Scott4, Naomi E. Vaughan5, Nico Bauer6, Duoying Ji7, Chris D. Jones8, Ben Kravitz9, Helene Muri10, and Kirsten Zickfeld11 1GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
2CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Australia
3Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Australia
4School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
5Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
6Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany
7College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
8Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter, UK
9Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
10Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
11Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
Abstract. The recent IPCC reports state that continued anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the climate, threatening severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts. Slow progress in emissions reduction to mitigate climate change is resulting in increased attention to what is called geoengineering, climate engineering, or climate intervention – deliberate interventions to counter climate change that seek to either modify the Earth's radiation budget or remove greenhouse gases such as CO2 from the atmosphere. When focused on CO2, the latter of these categories is called carbon dioxide removal (CDR). Future emission scenarios that stay well below 2 °C, and all emission scenarios that do not exceed 1.5 °C warming by the year 2100, require some form of CDR. At present, there is little consensus on the climate impacts and atmospheric CO2 reduction efficacy of the different types of proposed CDR. To address this need, the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (or CDRMIP) was initiated. This project brings together models of the Earth system in a common framework to explore the potential, impacts, and challenges of CDR. Here, we describe the first set of CDRMIP experiments, which are formally part of the 6th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). These experiments are designed to address questions concerning CDR-induced climate reversibility, the response of the Earth system to direct atmospheric CO2 removal (direct air capture and storage), and the CDR potential and impacts of afforestation and reforestation, as well as ocean alkalinization.>
Citation: Keller, D. P., Lenton, A., Scott, V., Vaughan, N. E., Bauer, N., Ji, D., Jones, C. D., Kravitz, B., Muri, H., and Zickfeld, K.: The Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (CDRMIP): rationale and experimental protocol for CMIP6, Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 1133-1160, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1133-2018, 2018.
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There is little consensus on the impacts and efficacy of proposed carbon dioxide removal (CDR) methods as a potential means of mitigating climate change. To address this need, the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (or CDR-MIP) has been initiated. This project brings together models of the Earth system in a common framework to explore the potential, impacts, and challenges of CDR. Here, we describe the first set of CDR-MIP experiments.
There is little consensus on the impacts and efficacy of proposed carbon dioxide removal (CDR)...
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