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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 11, issue 8
Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 3261-3278, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-3261-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: BACCHUS – Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions...

Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 3261-3278, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-3261-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Model description paper 13 Aug 2018

Model description paper | 13 Aug 2018

A parameterisation for the co-condensation of semi-volatile organics into multiple aerosol particle modes

Matthew Crooks et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Matthew Crooks on behalf of the Authors (15 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Mar 2018) by Klaus Gierens
AR by Matthew Crooks on behalf of the Authors (05 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Apr 2018) by Klaus Gierens
ED: Publish as is (19 Apr 2018) by Klaus Gierens
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Short summary
Clouds form when water condenses onto particles in the atmosphere and the size and chemical composition of these particles can have a large influence over how much water condenses and the subsequent formation of cloud. Additional gases exist in the atmosphere that can condense onto the aerosol particles and change their composition. We present a fast and efficient method of calculating the effect of atmospheric gases on the formation of cloud that can be used in climate and weather models.
Clouds form when water condenses onto particles in the atmosphere and the size and chemical...
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