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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 11, issue 3 | Copyright
Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 959-988, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-959-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Model evaluation paper 16 Mar 2018

Model evaluation paper | 16 Mar 2018

Global high-resolution simulations of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide using CHASER V4.0

Takashi Sekiya1, Kazuyuki Miyazaki1,2, Koji Ogochi1, Kengo Sudo3,1, and Masayuki Takigawa1 Takashi Sekiya et al.
  • 1Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan
  • 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
  • 3Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Abstract. We evaluate global tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) simulations using the CHASER V4.0 global chemical transport model (CTM) at horizontal resolutions of 0.56, 1.1, and 2.8°. Model evaluation was conducted using satellite tropospheric NO2 retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and aircraft observations from the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ). Agreement against satellite retrievals improved greatly at 1.1 and 0.56° resolutions (compared to 2.8° resolution) over polluted and biomass burning regions. The 1.1° simulation generally captured the regional distribution of the tropospheric NO2 column well, whereas 0.56° resolution was necessary to improve the model performance over areas with strong local sources, with mean bias reductions of 67% over Beijing and 73% over San Francisco in summer. Validation using aircraft observations indicated that high-resolution simulations reduced negative NO2 biases below 700hPa over the Denver metropolitan area. These improvements in high-resolution simulations were attributable to (1) closer spatial representativeness between simulations and observations and (2) better representation of large-scale concentration fields (i.e., at 2.8°) through the consideration of small-scale processes. Model evaluations conducted at 0.5 and 2.8° bin grids indicated that the contributions of both these processes were comparable over most polluted regions, whereas the latter effect (2) made a larger contribution over eastern China and biomass burning areas. The evaluations presented in this paper demonstrate the potential of using a high-resolution global CTM for studying megacity-scale air pollutants across the entire globe, potentially also contributing to global satellite retrievals and chemical data assimilation.

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We evaluate global tropospheric NO2 simulations using a chemical transport model (CTM) at horizontal resolutions of 0.56, 1.1, and 2.8°. Agreement against satellite retrievals improved greatly at 0.56 and 1.1° resolutions (compared to 2.8°) over polluted and biomass burning regions, especially over areas with strong local sources, such as a megacity. The evaluations demonstrate the potential of using a high-resolution global CTM for studying megacity-scale air pollutants across the entire globe.
We evaluate global tropospheric NO2 simulations using a chemical transport model (CTM) at...
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