Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Geosci. Model Dev., 3, 565-584, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-3-565-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
 
27 Oct 2010
Implementation and evaluation of a new methane model within a dynamic global vegetation model: LPJ-WHyMe v1.3.1
R. Wania1,*, I. Ross2,**, and I. C. Prentice3,*** 1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, UK
2School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Road, Bristol BS8 1SS, UK
3QUEST, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, UK
*now at: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3V6, Canada
**now at: Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3060 STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3R4, Canada
***now at: Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
Abstract. For the first time, a model that simulates methane emissions from northern peatlands is incorporated directly into a dynamic global vegetation model. The model, LPJ-WHyMe (LPJ Wetland Hydrology and Methane), was previously modified in order to simulate peatland hydrology, permafrost dynamics and peatland vegetation. LPJ-WHyMe simulates methane emissions using a mechanistic approach, although the use of some empirical relationships and parameters is unavoidable. The model simulates methane production, three pathways of methane transport (diffusion, plant-mediated transport and ebullition) and methane oxidation. A sensitivity test was conducted to identify the most important factors influencing methane emissions, followed by a parameter fitting exercise to find the best combination of parameter values for individual sites and over all sites. A comparison of model results to observations from seven sites resulted in normalised root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.40 to 1.15 when using the best site parameter combinations and 0.68 to 1.42 when using the best overall parameter combination.

Citation: Wania, R., Ross, I., and Prentice, I. C.: Implementation and evaluation of a new methane model within a dynamic global vegetation model: LPJ-WHyMe v1.3.1, Geosci. Model Dev., 3, 565-584, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-3-565-2010, 2010.
Publications Copernicus
Download
Share