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Volume 9, issue 4 | Copyright
Geosci. Model Dev., 9, 1545-1565, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-1545-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Model description paper 22 Apr 2016

Model description paper | 22 Apr 2016

The ecological module of BOATS-1.0: a bioenergetically constrained model of marine upper trophic levels suitable for studies of fisheries and ocean biogeochemistry

David Anthony Carozza1, Daniele Bianchi1,2,a, and Eric Douglas Galbraith1,b,c David Anthony Carozza et al.
  • 1Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • 2School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
  • anow at: Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • bnow at: Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Spain
  • cnow at: Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA) and Department of Mathematics, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain

Abstract. Environmental change and the exploitation of marine resources have had profound impacts on marine communities, with potential implications for ocean biogeochemistry and food security. In order to study such global-scale problems, it is helpful to have computationally efficient numerical models that predict the first-order features of fish biomass production as a function of the environment, based on empirical and mechanistic understandings of marine ecosystems. Here we describe the ecological module of the BiOeconomic mArine Trophic Size-spectrum (BOATS) model, which takes an Earth-system approach to modelling fish biomass at the global scale. The ecological model is designed to be used on an Earth-system model grid, and determines size spectra of fish biomass by explicitly resolving life history as a function of local temperature and net primary production. Biomass production is limited by the availability of photosynthetic energy to upper trophic levels, following empirical trophic efficiency scalings, and by well-established empirical temperature-dependent growth rates. Natural mortality is calculated using an empirical size-based relationship, while reproduction and recruitment depend on both the food availability to larvae from net primary production and the production of eggs by mature adult fish. We describe predicted biomass spectra and compare them to observations, and conduct a sensitivity study to determine how they change as a function of net primary production and temperature. The model relies on a limited number of parameters compared to similar modelling efforts, while retaining reasonably realistic representations of biological and ecological processes, and is computationally efficient, allowing extensive parameter-space analyses even when implemented globally. As such, it enables the exploration of the linkages between ocean biogeochemistry, climate, and upper trophic levels at the global scale, as well as a representation of fish biomass for idealized studies of fisheries.

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We present the ecological module of the BiOeconomic mArine Trophic Size-spectrum (BOATS) model, which takes an Earth-system approach to modeling upper trophic level biomass at the global scale. BOATS employs fundamental ecological principles and takes a simple approach that relies on fewer parameters compared to similar modelling efforts. As such, it enables the exploration of the linkages between ocean biogeochemistry, climate, upper trophic levels, and fisheries at the global scale.
We present the ecological module of the BiOeconomic mArine Trophic Size-spectrum (BOATS) model,...
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