Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Geosci. Model Dev., 9, 2471-2497, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-2471-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Model experiment description paper
25 Jul 2016
Experimental design for three interrelated marine ice sheet and ocean model intercomparison projects: MISMIP v. 3 (MISMIP +), ISOMIP v. 2 (ISOMIP +) and MISOMIP v. 1 (MISOMIP1)
Xylar S. Asay-Davis1, Stephen L. Cornford2, Gaël Durand3,4, Benjamin K. Galton-Fenzi5,6, Rupert M. Gladstone6,7, G. Hilmar Gudmundsson8, Tore Hattermann9,10, David M. Holland11, Denise Holland12, Paul R. Holland8, Daniel F. Martin13, Pierre Mathiot8,14, Frank Pattyn15, and Hélène Seroussi16 1Earth System Analysis, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany
2Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
3CNRS, LGGE, 38041 Grenoble, France
4Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, 38041 Grenoble, France
5Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania, Australia
6Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
7Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau, Hydrologie und Glaziologie (VAW), ETH Zurich, Switzerland
8British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK
9Akvaplan-niva, Tromsø, Norway
10Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
11Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY, USA
12Center for Global Sea Level Change, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, UAE
13Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
14Met Office, Exeter, UK
15Laboratoire de Glaciologie, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
16Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
Abstract. Coupled ice sheet–ocean models capable of simulating moving grounding lines are just becoming available. Such models have a broad range of potential applications in studying the dynamics of marine ice sheets and tidewater glaciers, from process studies to future projections of ice mass loss and sea level rise. The Marine Ice Sheet–Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (MISOMIP) is a community effort aimed at designing and coordinating a series of model intercomparison projects (MIPs) for model evaluation in idealized setups, model verification based on observations, and future projections for key regions of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS).

Here we describe computational experiments constituting three interrelated MIPs for marine ice sheet models and regional ocean circulation models incorporating ice shelf cavities. These consist of ice sheet experiments under the Marine Ice Sheet MIP third phase (MISMIP+), ocean experiments under the Ice Shelf-Ocean MIP second phase (ISOMIP+) and coupled ice sheet–ocean experiments under the MISOMIP first phase (MISOMIP1). All three MIPs use a shared domain with idealized bedrock topography and forcing, allowing the coupled simulations (MISOMIP1) to be compared directly to the individual component simulations (MISMIP+ and ISOMIP+). The experiments, which have qualitative similarities to Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf and the adjacent region of the Amundsen Sea, are designed to explore the effects of changes in ocean conditions, specifically the temperature at depth, on basal melting and ice dynamics. In future work, differences between model results will form the basis for the evaluation of the participating models.


Citation: Asay-Davis, X. S., Cornford, S. L., Durand, G., Galton-Fenzi, B. K., Gladstone, R. M., Gudmundsson, G. H., Hattermann, T., Holland, D. M., Holland, D., Holland, P. R., Martin, D. F., Mathiot, P., Pattyn, F., and Seroussi, H.: Experimental design for three interrelated marine ice sheet and ocean model intercomparison projects: MISMIP v. 3 (MISMIP +), ISOMIP v. 2 (ISOMIP +) and MISOMIP v. 1 (MISOMIP1), Geosci. Model Dev., 9, 2471-2497, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-2471-2016, 2016.
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Coupled ice sheet–ocean models capable of simulating moving grounding lines are just becoming available. Such models have a broad range of potential applications in studying the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers, including assessing their contributions to sea level change. Here we describe the idealized experiments that make up three interrelated Model Intercomparison Projects (MIPs) for marine ice sheet models and regional ocean circulation models incorporating ice shelf cavities.
Coupled ice sheet–ocean models capable of simulating moving grounding lines are just becoming...
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